Category Archives: Residential Architecture

I REALLY want this house!

I really do. Located in Sydney, the photos of this amazing house speak for themselves. Built in 2012, the Cosgriff House utilizes plenty of natural lighting with large windows and sky lights as well as large flowing open spaces…

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Images courtesy of Brett Boardman

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Old fashioned rail station turned into modern home

Leave it to the Dutch to be creative and turn an obsolete crumbling old building into a truly unique expression of modernism such as this case of an old train station converted into a private home in Santpoort. The home owners wanted to preserve the spirit of the rail station so a modern extension with a rust and glass facade was added with the intent to compliment rather than detract from original structure which provides all the modern amenities inside to go with all that history outside.

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Images courtesy Zecc Architects

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Eco-Friendly Luxury Living…In A Shipping Container.

When we think of shipping containers; green comfortable livings spaces probably isn’t one the first images to come to mind but architects and builders have increasingly been using ubiquitous steel boxes into inviting and revolutionary meeting and living spaces. Typically when these containers reach the end of their useful lives, they are scrapped but this doesn’t mean they are no longer useful. Most are still durable enough to be “upcycled” into innovative architecture…

ImageHome in Spain

ImageHome in Canada

ImageShopping center in Cholula, Mexico

ImageStarbucks in Tukwila, Washington

ImageHome in San Antonio, Texas

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Container City in London, UK

Images courtesy of their respective owners

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Church living

With church membership tumbling in the developed world, this equates a rising number of empty church buildings entering the real estate market. While some are taken over by other congregations, many are torn down due to the lack of alternative uses for such buildings. However, there are a few enterprising individuals opting to turn them into homes.

This 1877 stone church in Adelaide, Australia has been completely transformed into a fully functional home with all the modern comforts:

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The minimalist home below was originally a 1870 Gothic church in Utrecht, Netherlands:

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Converted Church in Northumberland, England:

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It is good to see quality architecture such as these examples given a new lease on life rather than torn down in the name of progress and replaced by an IKEA.

(Images via their respective owners)

Via Apartment Therapy

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What would make your home complete? A rooftop fish farm of course…

Lets face it, humanity’s growth and development has not been so good for the natural environment and one of those areas is our insatiable appetite which is wreaking havoc on ecosystems all over the globe and one area in particular is overfishing which has depleted many species to dangerous levels disrupting and already fragile marine ecology. There has been a growing trend of sustainable agriculture such as locally grown food and urban farming but a group of food futurists want to use that model and apply it to fish farming.

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Urban farming has taken off in recent years with many cities turning vacant lots into gardens and while apartment building owners are also getting on board with rooftop gardens. Now, Urban Farmers AG wants to build rooftop fish farms. Their idea is a self contained aquaponics dome that addresses food security and lessen our impact on lakes and oceans. Aquaponics being a combination of aquaculture and hydroponics so it not only does it provide fish, it also produces vegetables and herbs. To go even further with the green impact, the dome would be constructed of renewable and natural materials such as bamboo.

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Via Gizmag

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Hemp. You can eat it, wear it and now…build with it

Hemp is a topic of much debate and controversy  due to its association with its more potent cousin, marijuana but hemp has no psychoactive qualities and is highly versatile and sustainable. Due to the U.S. government unable or unwilling able to make the distinction between hemp and marijuana, it is illegal to cultivate though it is a net importer and hemp products are readily available in certain parts the country. Among these, hempcrete, which is a mixture of hemp hurds and lime and offers a eco-friendly alternative to concrete and is not as brittle however, it lacks the compressible strength of concrete so application is somewhat limited in larger structures. As an added bonus, it is carbon negative which means it absorbs carbon dioxide.

Though widely used in several countries around the world, it’s adoption in the United States has been extremely limited as widespread industrial usage of hemp would require to cultivation which means challenging federal and state drug laws governing Cannabis. This has not stopped North Carolina home builder, Hemp Technologies from taking on the uphill battle of convincing local and federal officials the environmental benefits of hempcrete and hopefully repeal laws banning hemp production.  They have already constructed homes in several states including the home below in Asheville, their first.

Images courtesy of Tradical (brick) and Hemp Technologies (house)

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Dick Clark’s cave house

OK, so this isn’t exactly futuristic architecture though Fred Flintstone might be impressed with the modern amenities and glass windows. Owned by Dick Clark, who recently passed away, who in addition to being well-known for American Bandstand and being a staple of the New Years’ Eve ball drop in Times Square, was also known for his cave house in Malibu. The one bedroom home is straight out of the Flinstones right down to the furniture and decor. Put on the market before Clark’s death, it can be yours for $3.5million.

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Casa Bromelia

Casa Bromelia, designed by Urban Recycle Studio finished in December 2011 in Salvador, Bahia in Brazil.

Via ArchDaily

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Images courtesy of Urban Recycle Architecture Studio

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Vertical gardens are growing in urban areas

With the appeal of dense urban living growing in popularity around the world, the desire to green these spaces is also growing. This often means sacrificing space for convenience and for those without front or back yards, think of these urban gardens as “vertical lawns”. An added benefit is that they can be used as actual gardens to grow food in addition to provided a green oasis in the concrete jungle.

Via Herald Sun

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Image courtesy of John Grainger

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The quest for the greenest house in Canada

With the aid of 20 students, the Endeavour Centre seeks to build a 2,000 square foot zero-energy house in Peterborough, Ontario and will serve as a training facility to certify builders to design and construct green homes. The project also hopes to meet the Living Building Challenge standard, an certification recognized around the world that promotes the most sustainable building designs.

via Peterborough Examiner

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Images courtesy of Endeavour Centre

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