Tag Archives: green buildings

Fast, Easy, Bamboo….

Green minded home builders have been looking for the most sustainable methods for building their homes from recycled materials, adobe bricks to building underground, however, it seems that bamboo is probably the most eco-friendly and sustainable of all. Unlike “normal” trees which supply framing for traditional homes, bamboo is fast growing which allows it to be replenished in a fraction of the time it requires to grow a tree and it is very sturdy. In fact, In many East Asian countries, bamboo is the preferred choose for scaffolding over steal we seen in the west.

The-bamboo-houses

Bamboo-dome-shelter-2

Images courtesy of their respective owners

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

Algae-Powered BIQ House – First Of A Kind

The BIQ House, located in Hamburg, is the first of its kind to harness probably what is one of the world’s most plentiful renewable resources. Algae. Of which is embedded in the facade is bio-reactive and responds to environmental conditions much as a living organism would. In bright sunlight, the algae grows faster creating more shading on warmer days as well as capture thermal heat…lessening costs of traditional heating/ cooling methods…a major concern for large commercial buildings. In addition, the biomass can also be harvested to further power the building as biofuel. This is just the beginning in what ARUP,  one the project designers involved, predicts will be a major transformation in sustainable much needed design over the next 50 years. Happy Earth Day!

Image

Image

Images Courtesy of ARUP

Tagged , , ,

Hemp. You can eat it, wear it and now…build with it

Hemp is a topic of much debate and controversy  due to its association with its more potent cousin, marijuana but hemp has no psychoactive qualities and is highly versatile and sustainable. Due to the U.S. government unable or unwilling able to make the distinction between hemp and marijuana, it is illegal to cultivate though it is a net importer and hemp products are readily available in certain parts the country. Among these, hempcrete, which is a mixture of hemp hurds and lime and offers a eco-friendly alternative to concrete and is not as brittle however, it lacks the compressible strength of concrete so application is somewhat limited in larger structures. As an added bonus, it is carbon negative which means it absorbs carbon dioxide.

Though widely used in several countries around the world, it’s adoption in the United States has been extremely limited as widespread industrial usage of hemp would require to cultivation which means challenging federal and state drug laws governing Cannabis. This has not stopped North Carolina home builder, Hemp Technologies from taking on the uphill battle of convincing local and federal officials the environmental benefits of hempcrete and hopefully repeal laws banning hemp production.  They have already constructed homes in several states including the home below in Asheville, their first.

Images courtesy of Tradical (brick) and Hemp Technologies (house)

Tagged , ,

This is Wendy and she’s here to clean the air and say ‘hi’.

Sorry, Wendy is not an actual person but a big blue star encased an elaborate scaffolding apparatus and employs fabric coated in nanoparticles which neutralizes airborne toxins. Designed by New York firm, HWKN, it is to be constructed at MoMA’s  PS1 location in Queens for the summer where ‘she’ will host music festivals and remove the equivalent of 260 cars worth of pollutants.

Images courtesy of HWKN

Tagged , ,

Surreal Marina + Beach Towers in Dubai

Due to be completed this year, the Marina + Beach Towers will be a mixed-use development which will highlight self-sustainability while the design also embraces the natural landscape with its sweeping angles and maximizes views while reducing direct sunlight on the hotel guests.

Images courtesy of Oppenheim Architecture+Design

Tagged

Plantscraper takes vertical farming to the next level. Literally

The future occupants of this skyscraper will be of the green variety but the not of the money-making human types but fruits and vegetables. Designed and developed by Plantagon, the structure has broken ground in Linkoping, Sweden and takes urban farming to the next level. This “plantscraper” will provide the community with plenty off fresh vegetables while any green waste left behind will be recycled into biogas and used to heating and cooling systems.

Images via Plantagon

Thanks to Futurist, Glenn Hough, for the tip!

Tagged ,

Casa Bromelia

Casa Bromelia, designed by Urban Recycle Studio finished in December 2011 in Salvador, Bahia in Brazil.

Via ArchDaily

ImageImageImage

Image

Images courtesy of Urban Recycle Architecture Studio

Tagged

This building proposal goes with the flow

This proposal submitted by design firm Betillon/Dorval-Bory for Costa Rican NGO, FUNDECOR, would emphasize the organization’s commitment to sustainability by designing the building to maximize airflow as well as allow as much natural light as possible and minimizing its presence on the surrounding environment. Fresh air flows in to through front of the building and is expelled out the back via a blacktop heated by the sun which forces air upward and out of the building.

Unfortunately, this proposal didn’t win the design competition.

Via Inhabitat

Image

Image

Image

Images courtesy of Betillon/Dorval-Bory

Tagged ,

The quest for the greenest house in Canada

With the aid of 20 students, the Endeavour Centre seeks to build a 2,000 square foot zero-energy house in Peterborough, Ontario and will serve as a training facility to certify builders to design and construct green homes. The project also hopes to meet the Living Building Challenge standard, an certification recognized around the world that promotes the most sustainable building designs.

via Peterborough Examiner

Image

Images courtesy of Endeavour Centre

Tagged

Taking architecture to the seas

While the notion of living at undersea living might sound like science fiction, it might become a reality in the not too distant future as magnitude of rising sea levels spurred by climate change become more apparent. Furthermore, 70% of the planet surface is covered by oceans which creates a unique opportunity for developers.

Via EcoFriend

Image

Taiwan Skyscraper

Image

Underwater Skyscraper 7 by De Bever architects

Image

Gyre

Image

Undersea Scraper, self sufficient tower

Tagged